Bones

Saturday, January 22, 2011

Madan fell from the monkey bars on Thursday. By the time I got to school he was waiting outside the front gate shivering with a frightened look on his face. His arm was just hanging there all twisted and swollen. I've seen a lot of broken bones in my day but this was by far the worst, hard to look at even.

In this year alone he's fallen 30 feet from a tree onto a pile of bricks, almost drowned in a swimming pool, and has now completely detached and distorted his elbow from the rest of his arm.  He's spent the last three days walking around with his arm at a 60 degree angle above his head and sleeping at night with it tied above his head to the window yelling out in pain.  It's terrible to watch.

I rushed him to the hospital on Thursday only to find that the counter at the hospital where you get your ticket was closed.  So I took him to the emergency room, only to find that there was no doctor so I took him to a nurse who told me to get an x-ray, so I took him to the x-ray room to find there were 30 people and their families waiting in line ahead of us.  It was sure to be a 3 hour wait in a very crowded hospital.  I looked at the line and there were no other kids in it.  I decided they should let Madan to the front because he was a kid, and clearly the youngest person in the room.  The guy at the counter said we had to wait our turn.  Madan wasn't crying or showing any sign that he was in pain.  That's just the kind of kid he is.  He never cries; like ever; come to think of it I don't think I've never seen him shed a single tear.

"Madan, tell them it hurts, otherwise we're going to be here all day and we'll never get to see the doctor."

"Dukioo," (it hurts) he mumbled under his breath.

"Louder Madan!" I said whispering and holding his arm.

"Dukioooooo," he said a little louder.

"Madan, this is an emergency you have to get your x-ray right this minute.  Now tell them how much pain you're in."

"Dukioooo, Dukiooooo, Dukioooooooo," he shouted at the top of his lungs.

All the other people in line looked at his arm and told the guys at the counter to let the child to the front of the line.  And we finally got our x-ray and after another hour got in to see the doctor who told us how bad the break was and that it had to be manually pulled back into place and then he would probably need surgery with pins and rods and all of that but nothing could be done until the swelling went down and to bring him in after the weekend.  He's headed to the hospital again now with Tope in the Scorpio.

Normally I would go along and be there for him while they try to relocate his elbow.  I would hold his hand and stroke his hair and tell him that everything's going to be okay and watch while they do the whole procedure. But I've decided this one will be too hard for me to watch.  I can deal with childbirth and stitches but the thought of what they're about to do gives me the chills and makes me nervous.  I can barely even look at his arm.  I've come to the conclusion over the past few days that I would make a terrible Orthopedic, the worst. So Madan's headed off to the hospital to get his right arm taken care of.  I will go to visit a little later. 

Now I understand why they have playground monitors in the U.S.  In fact, my mom told me we needed a playground monitor two weeks ago.  Always take my mom's advice or it will just come back to bite you.  As for Madan, we'll appreciate all your healing thoughts for his right elbow the next few days.

Back to the Journal